Barnard Awards for Videomicrographs – 2020

Sinclair Stammers judged the videomicrographs before they were revealed at the virtual Annual Exhibition of Microscopy on Wednesday 30th September 2020, and had the difficult job of deciding which of the excellent videos from members of the Quekett, the Iceni Microscopy Study Group and the Postal Microscopical Society were of a sufficiently high standard to deserve a certificate.

The entries that deserved certificates were announced after the lecture on Saturday 3rd October. Sinclair decided that certificates should be awarded to David Linstead (Collotheca unfurls its sails), Willem Cramer (Carp louse) and Daryan Chitsaz (Confocal time-lapse).

Chris Algar

Rotifers feeding

The rotifers were collected from a bird bath. Filmed using an Olympus BH-2 microscope with bright field illumination and 10× and 20× objectives. Canon EOS 7D camera. Edited using iMovie software.
Sinclair’s comments: Excellent clear video of the rotifer Philodina feeding on algal cells, bright field works well.


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

Vorticella

The Vorticella were collected from a garden pond and photographed using various objective magnifications on an Olympus BH-2 microscope with bright field illumination. Canon EOS 7D camera. Edited using iMovie software.
Sinclair’s comments: Vorticella is a familiar subject but the rapid contractions of the wavy myoneme fibres at the core of the stalk are quite mesmerising, good stable video of a fascinating subject.


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

Chris Thomas

Wood from an angiosperm tree

Sinclair’s comments: Thinking in 3 dimensions can be a hard concept to get across to students, and this video very successfully and succinctly demonstrates the 3 image planes that timber scientists use routinely to characterise wood in Angiosperms.


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

Wood from a gymnosperm tree

Sinclair’s comments: Similarly this video demonstrates very well the 3 image planes used to describe wood in Gymnosperms.


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Daryan Chitsaz – Barnard Award

Sinclair’s comments: Wonderful Time Lapse! Utterly magical image, it’s great the way confocal microscopy show such delicate structures.

Macrophage munching on myelin


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Three oligodendrocytes on wires


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Withering brain cells


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David Linstead

Collotheca unfurls its sails – Barnard Award

Zeiss Standard microscope with DIC, ordinary halogen illumination and a Reichert fluorite 16× objective. Panasonic Lumix GX9 camera coupled afocally with 30mm Sigma micro4/3 prime lens and a Leitz Periplan 10×20 eyepiece (with 28mm eyecup thread). Processing of the raw video was with Serif Movie Plus X6.
Sinclair’s comments: Exquisite unfurling of the infundibulum in the rotifer Collotheca which opens like a blossom, they have extremely long tentacle-like cilia surrounding the corona. Differential Interference Contrast shows the fine tentacles beautifully.


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

Floscularia

Zeiss Standard microscope with DIC, ordinary halogen illuminationand a Reichert fluorite 16× objective. Canon M3 camera coupled afocally with 30mm Sigma micro4/3 prime lens and a Leitz Periplan 10×20 eyepiece (with 28mm eyecup thread). Processing of the raw video was with Serif Movie Plus X6.
Sinclair’s comments: Very nice composition and clarity of focus, although the fuzzy area bottom right is a tad distracting.


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Stephanoceros plays pinball with Chlamydomonas

Zeiss Standard microscope with DIC, ordinary halogen illumination and a Reichert fluorite 16× objective. Panasonic Lumix GX9 camera coupled afocally with 30mm Sigma micro4/3 prime lens and a Leitz Periplan 10×20 eyepiece (with 28mm eyecup thread). Processing of the raw video was with Serif Movie Plus X6.
Sinclair’s comments: Beautiful image! perfect composition, fine detail and smooth movements are superb.


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Deborah Kapell

Two rotifers, two amoebas and an air bubble

These were taken from a broad puddle that exists for a few days after heavy rain then dries up until the next rain. Bdelloid rotifers are the perfect inhabitants of puddles – they contract into cysts when the environment dries then come out again when the water returns. The sample was taken in April, 2020 from a recurring puddle in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
Taken using an Olympus BH-2 BHTU, 20× objective, phase contrast. Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera. Color was enhanced in PhotoShop.
Sinclair’s comments: Very elegant clear footage, phase contrast works very well with these microorganisms.


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

Grenham Ireland

Breakfast for worm larva

A spionid worm larva was isolated using a glass pipette from a marine plankton sample and confined in a glass ring with copepod eggs to try and replicate observed feeding behaviour.
Bright field image using 4× objective and Olympus BH-2 microscope of sample in a 2 mm glass ring held in a plastic dish. Recorded with a Panasonic GH6 camera and edited with Movie maker.
Sinclair’s comments: Very amusing Voice Over, I like the way the video tells a story about the behaviour of this tiny marine annelid. I hope it didn’t miss breakfast! However I would criticise the rather messy composition, with no attempt to find a neutral white balance!


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Sinclair Stammers

Fairy shrimps

Chirocephalus diaphanus from Hergest Ridge shallow ponds


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Willem Cramer

Carp louse – Barnard Award

Sinclair’s comments: Fab quality dark field video microscopy. My sympathy goes with the fish that have to suffer these awful ectoparasites.


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Skeletal muscle tissue

Sinclair’s comments: Super quality stained thin sections of muscle cells, the track and zoom used in this video is very effective and helps direct the viewer to the interesting features.


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Volvox bloom

Sinclair’s comments: Very nice clean images, however I have a few criticisms. The coenobia all look like they have been filmed under laboratory conditions, in other words flat in one plane. Volvox look so much more beautiful when they are swimming freely in 3 dimensions!


Click the arrow to start the video; click the symbol to the left of “vimeo” for a larger version

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